Fair Wage Which Careers are Still the Worst Paid for Women

The topic of fair wages for the sexes has been a hot button issue since the women’s movement in the early 70’s. Activists continue to raise awareness, which has been able to make a small impact, and though women have earned these nominal gains, the fight is ongoing. A New Jersey Harassment Attorney says wage and workplace discrimination cases are still quite common. The crux of the debate has been equal pay for equal work for those with the same credentials. Unfortunately, in the last 40 years these four jobs still lag far behind in closing the earnings gap.

Financial Sector
This industry has a dismal record when it comes to fair wages. The top three jobs in the field include financial manager, advisor, and services agent. Statistics show the structure of compensation packages tends to be the culprit. This means commissions, bonuses, and merit lead the way to unfair earning differences between genders. However, bias is also cited as a cause, as well as discrimination.

Medical Field
Specialties have been the leading factor for potential wages doctors earn. While this is still the case, women in specialties such as cardiology and neurology still encounter a large income gap. The rationale of male-dominated no longer fits, because pediatrics has more female physicians who are still earning less. This turns the discussion to amount of time at work. Opponents point to the prevalence of male doctors working more hours per week, while their female counterpart work less due to motherhood and pregnancy.

Business Sector
Top male executives with the same education and experience are consistently paid more than their female colleagues. Female executives hired for a position with more education and experience still deal with compensation package inequity. The responsibilities for a CEO have the same expectations no matter who is in the role, however the earnings consistently do not reflect this. Females can outperform the business critical bottom line, but still earn a lesser amount.

Logistics Industry
Long and short distance truck driver jobs are included in the income gap conversation. Critics point to long hours and time away from home, as well as fewer women on the job, though this reasoning does not address the pay inequity for those that match their male counterparts in all areas. Regardless of the number of female truck drivers on the roads, the pay per mile remains lower.

It does not matter what career or industry, each example of the unfair wage gap reviewed demonstrates a 30 to 40 percent deficit. While ingrained discrimination is a catalyst, advocates believe societal norms regarding gender roles have skewed the issue more. One thing is certain, something has to give in order to give women a more equal chance in their careers.

 

Written by